Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Fake-It Yourself Bisquick

One of the first things I noticed in the grocery store in New Zealand was the absence of Bisquick…or anything remotely related to a biscuit mix.  My hubby LOVES Bisquick Pancakes, so I had to find a way to rectify this situation post-haste!  I went online to find recipes, and after a bit of tinkering, this is the one I think tastes most like, and cooks most like, Bisquick.  Here in the US, it’s still worth my while to make up a batch to save a few bucks!

Ingredients:
1 Bag of Flour (5lb. bag)
5 Teaspoons Salt
20 Teaspoons Sugar
2/3 Cup Baking Powder
2 Cups Shortening (Crisco Style, no butter or margarine)



Oh, and you’ll need a BIG Bowl!

First, dump the flour into the bowl and add all of the other dry ingredients.  Using a whisk, mix the dry ingredients together.



Next, measure out the 2 Cups of shortening and put it on top of your dry ingredients.



Take your rings and your watch off, cause it’s time to put your hands into it!  Mix the shortening into the dry ingredients using your hands.  This doesn’t take as long as you might think.



Keep mixing and rubbing the shortening in until there are no visible pieces of shortening left and the mixture seems uniform.  Don’t forget to dig deep and get the dry ingredients on the bottom of the bowl, too!  I like to put some of the mixture in between my hands and rub them together to achieve uniformity and to feel for small bits of shortening:



You can tell it’s done when the mixure has the texture of cornmeal and it can form a ball when pressed together like this:



That’s it!  Now you can put it into storage bags.  I divided mine into three bags of 8 Cups each, which is the same amount you get in one regular box of Bisquick.



Fake Bisquick can stay in your pantry for up to one year…just like the real thing!  Use it as you would in any Bisquick recipe…or split it up into individual Shake’N'Pour Pancake Mixes* (see below).

The Fake-It Yourself Breakdown:

Fake Bisquick, Yield 24 Cups (Aldi Flour $1.78, Shortening $1.00, Baking Powder $1.14, other ingredients are too small in amount to count)

Fake-It Yourself Cost:  $3.92

Real Bisquick, 3 Boxes ($3.59 each)

Total Fake-It Yourself Savings:  $6.85

*If you wanted to use your Bisquick solely for making pancakes, you could scoop 2 Cups of mix into a Quart Size Mason Jars, yielding 12 jars of Fake Shake’N'Pour pancake mix!  Compare to Bisquick’s Shake’N'Pour at $2.59 each and you’ve got a Fake-It Yourself Savings of $27.16. 

To make Shake’N'Pour pancakes, add 1 Cup Milk and 2 Eggs to the jar and SHAKE!

62 comments:

  1. I just came across your site & Facebook site and am intrigued by all the money-saving tips. I love this homemade Bisquick mix and am wondering if I could substitute some whole wheat flour for part of the white flour -- like a 50/50 mix?

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  2. Substituting whole wheat flour is an awesome idea! I'm sure the results would be similar...and healthier! Cheers!

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    Replies
    1. Whole wheat flour has less gluten - an ingredient which helps make breads light & fluffy. Whole wheat flour will probably make a slightly denser bisquit, which is not bad, just be prepared for it to be a little different.

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  3. I made this today but instead of just plain crisco I used the butter flavored crisco and it made some awesome biscuits. I will never buy another box of bisquick again. :)

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  4. Oh, this is fantastic! My husbands friends over in the UK cant get bisquik and LOVE it. They will truly appreciate a DIY version!

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  5. I am an Expat in Germany and cannot find Bisquick here. This idea is perfect!! Thanks so much for coming up with so many great ideas.

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  6. This is awesome....will be making this on the weekend...we love blueberry pancakes and the mix here is a real money saver! Thanks for all you do!

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  7. Oh my I forgot about this! I'm old enough to have had home economics in jr and senior high school and we made this and I still have this receipe. Thanks for reminding me of this.

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  8. I am a clinical microbiologist in a medical laboratory. If I were storing this for a year, I would definitely make this up using disposable gloves over my hands (and washing my hands well before donning the gloves). Hands are a huge source of bacteria. If you live in a warmer climate, especially without air conditioning, your mix will get to be in the range of our incubator temperature (35C or 98F) that we use to grow bacteria on agar plates. It might be safer freezing this. Other than that, sounds like a good idea!

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    Replies
    1. I would think that just the process of cooking would kill any bacteria. Washing hands well before handling food is something most of us do anyway. Otherwise maybe a good old fashioned pastry blender or food processer might work too!

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    2. I was thinking to put gloves on myself since I'm kind of paranoid about bacteria issues even though I wash my hands thoroughly. My pastry blender gave up so the glove idea sounds good until I find a really good pastry blender.

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    3. There are also dough beaters on some mixers that could do the job of mixing without using hands but I do agree that bacteria could grow on it. Maybe cooking would kill the bacteria but is it worth it to assume that it will? I've made this recipe many times and the instructions I have call for it to be stored in the refrigerator.

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    4. Thank you bactitech! I was wondering if this would keep and if I should freeze it!

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    5. The boxes of Bisquick say to refrigerate after opening. Didn't know why. Think that's because of bacteria?

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    6. I believe you can't be too sanitary in the kitchen. Also, flours go stale, especially in areas that have fluctuating humidity and temperature, so if you have the space in the fridge or freezer, the mix would stay fresher longer if refrigerated or frozen. If you use it fast enough, a few weeks in the cupboard won't hurt.

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    7. As I read this I too was thinking about the bacteria. I don't remember if it was a national or a local newscast but there were outbreaks of food poisoning from people using open Bisquick that had been stored in the cupboard for a few months instead of the refrig. I plan to make this, but the spare bags will be put in the freezer and the bag in use into the refrigerator.

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  9. Expat in Saudi and this is awesome. No Bisquik here so will be making this today. Thank you for sharing.

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  10. This is great thanks!- live in NZ and was wanting to make biscuits! (Had them in the US and loved them) Could you tell me what you need to add to the mix, and how long to cook it for to actually make the biscuits? Thanks!

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    Replies
    1. Greetings, NZ! To make basic biscuits, mix 2 1/4 Cup Biscuit Mix with 2/3 Cup Milk. Knead dough, but do not over knead. Cut into 1/2 inch circles and bake at 425 degrees for 8 minutes. Paired with some of that delicious NZ butter, they are heavenly! For tons of other Bisquick recipes, check out this site: http://www.bettycrocker.com/recipes/product-recipes/bisquick-recipes/all-bisquick-recipes

      Cheers!

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  11. Excited about all your recipes

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  12. Love this! I am new at being a stay at home Mom. Now that I have the time I am loving things like this! Thank you!

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  13. I absolutely love this recipe. My son had this at his Grandmother's house the other day and has been begging for it ever since. I thought it would be a really time consuming recipe, but I split the recipe in 1/2 and used my Kitchen Aid. Amazingly easy!! Thank you!!

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  14. Fern from Canada

    thank for for all your recipes i will definitely make the Bisquick. Great idea to do the mason jar easy and quit when you have the grandkids visiting. thank again.

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  15. Plan on this when my Bisquick runs out. Thanks for the info!

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  16. Any way to make this work without using Crisco? I don't consume hydrogenated oils (trans fats). [Crisco says no trans fat per serving, which is ridiculous since all it is is hydrogenated oil, which IS trans fat. So awful that they can get away with that advertising loophole (the per serving thing) to make people think their product isn't terrible for you.]

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    Replies
    1. Wren, Sorry, but the only thing that is shelf-stable is Crisco (which they use in real Bisquick, too).

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    2. If you use butter or margarine, can't you store it in the fridge?? Will that work?

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  17. @Wren: I've found an organic, non-transfat "shortening" at Whole Foods. It's 100% Palm Oil and is shelf-stable and works just like regular Crisco shortening. I've been using it for a couple years, and even do cake decorating with it and it pipes perfectly! If you don't have a Whole Foods, it's also available on Amazon.

    --Julie in San Jose

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    Replies
    1. Meant to say to type in "organic shortening" at Amazon and you should be able to find it. It is, however, more expensive than Crisco but that's what happens when you start buying organic options.

      --Julie

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    2. @anonymous-I thought tropical oils were in the bad fat category with the transfat, saturated fat, and partially hydrogenated fat.
      I personally use the cheaper store-brand shortening.
      The recipe i've used for years to make homemade Bisquick includes powdered milk. Since it's the most expensive ingredient of them all, I'm going to try this recipe.
      When you make your own, you can tweak the recipe the way you like it. We now prefer my homemade version to the store.
      As far as storage, I've always used air-tight containers. Never heard that opened boxes of Bisquick has been linked to food poisoning. I'll start putting it in the fridge/freezer now. Thanks to the info!

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  18. Hi, I was wondering if you or any of your followers have heard of anyone using your Bisquick recipe with gluten free flour? Just curious. Great idea though! This seems way healthier than using store bought. Especially if you use the organic shortening. Thank you for the recipes!! :)

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    Replies
    1. I have not heard of that yet, but if you experiment with the gluten free flour and get good results, let us know about it! Cheers!

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  19. I think you could use your food processor to mix the shortening into the dry ingredients and save yourself a lot of work. What do you think?

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    Replies
    1. Great idea! If you try it, let us know if it works well for you!

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  20. Love your blog. :)

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  21. Happy to have this recipe, live in Mexico and cannot get Bisquick here either

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  22. I am confused, the recipe says it will make three 8 cup portions, I made it as directed and it made two 8 cup portions.

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  23. Quick question, once the dry mix is made, what do I need to add to make the pancakes? Sorry, might have missed it here.

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  24. article says:
    *If you wanted to use your Bisquick solely for making pancakes, you could scoop 2 Cups of mix into a Quart Size Mason Jars, yielding 12 jars of Fake Shake’N'Pour pancake mix! Compare to Bisquick’s Shake’N'Pour at $2.59 each and you’ve got a Fake-It Yourself Savings of $27.16.

    To make Shake’N'Pour pancakes, add 1 Cup Milk and 2 Eggs to the jar and SHAKE

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  25. Thanks so much for sharing. Just made this morning and used butter flavored Crisco, 1/2 AP Flour, 1/2 Whole Wheat Flour. Then we had Pancakes for breakfast. They were wonderful.

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  26. I think if you freeze the mix you could use real butter instead of the transfatty shortening or the expensive palm oil "shortening". Be aware though that salted butter will increase the salt and sodium in the recipe. So you may wish to use unsalted butter or reduce the amount of salt in the recipe.

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  27. GREAT RECIPE!!
    The first time I tried this recipe, was very impressed but there was something different about the texture of the finished product (pancakes, biscuits, dumplings, etc.).
    The second time I tried this recipe, I added 5 TABLESPOONS of CORN STARCH. Big difference in the texture. Pancakes are puffier and biscuits are flakier.
    Basically, adding corn starch to flour creates cake flour. Recipe for making cake flour is on the corn starch label, but I only added 1 tablespoon per pound of flour, not per cup of flour.

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  28. Thank you for this awesome recipe! I love using Bisquick for scones, (usually in bulk for a church event) but it got really expensive buying so many boxes. I thought there should be a way to DIY it!
    I'm going to make up a bunch of this! I'm expecting my first child, and the easier the cooking, the better :)

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    Replies
    1. I'd love to try your scone recipe!

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  29. Thank you for your recipes. I live in the UAE and cannot get shortening. Is there anything I can replace for the shortening in the recipe for Bisquick? Thanks you!

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  30. thank you so much for all of your frugal fake outs! Funny thing is, I am an American living in New Zealand so I am loving these things that are not sold here. I am happy to be raising my family in the beautiful place but I do miss me some cookie dough ice cream!!

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  31. me again from New Zealand. I have not seen crsico here. I have seen 'kremelta' but it's about $7 for a tub. So using two cups would be pricey. Any other suggestions?

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  32. I'm in Australia and haven't seen Crisco either. Are there any other shelf stable products I could use?

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  33. I grew up without boxed mixes and never heard of Bisquick until a friend in college pulled a box out and made a cake with broiled coconut topping on it. Frankly, I wasn't impressed due the fact that I was accustomed to made from scratch desserts and could taste a difference.

    Believe it or not, making flaky, biscuits from scratch is just as quick and easy as making the bisquick mix. Butter is used in my families' favorite recipe thus addressing those who are concerned about consuming hydrogenated fats, as I am.

    The same is true for buttermilk pancakes and waffles - very easy and yummy from scratch.

    Just want to encourage you to try it.

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  34. Could you replace the Crisco with coconut oil? as it is shelf stable and has the consistency of crisco when unheated... We also do not consume hydrogenated oils so I was hoping to try this? any thoughts???

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  35. I just got a big box of Bisquick on sale, but this will come in handy some day I am sure!
    20 tsp seems like a lot of measuring. I have a hard time keeping track after 5! If my calculations are correct, that would be roughly 1/3 C + 1TBS +1tsp sugar =20 tsp, correct?

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  36. I was raised with a different receipe ..
    9 Cups sifted all purpose flour
    1/3 Cup double acting baking powder
    1 cup + 2 Tbls non-fat powdered milk or powdered sweet buttermilk
    4 tsp salt
    1 ¾ Cup vegetable shortening or 1 ½ cup lard


    1. Stir baking powder, dry milk and salt into the sifted flour. Be sure all ingredients are well mixed.
    2. Cut shortening into flour mixture until it resembles coarse cornmeal.
    3. Store in air-tight container.

    Note:
    Should you have a special recipe that has not been adapted for use with Missouri mix, you may substitute 1 ½ cups of the mix for each cup of flour called for in your recipe. The mix will contain the necessary portion of baking powder, salt, shortening and milk.

    When measuring the mix for recipes, do not sift the mix. Stir lightly before measuring, lift lightly into cup and level with spatula.

    Liquid shortening or oil can not be substituted. However if you first make up a mix of only dry ingredients you may add oil an liquid to the dry mix as you make each recipe. If you do this just add 2 Tbls additional liquid to the liquid called for in the recipe and follow mixing directions as given. Oil in the mix makes satisfactory biscuits, muffins and coffee cakes. But cakes are not satisfactory.

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  37. Would you reduce the amounts of ingredients so that i can use THIS recipe to make your "Fake" Pillsbury Freezer Biscuits. That would be very appreciated. I know it would be reduced into 3rds but I thought you might tweak it different or suggest some other tip if needed.

    Intrigued with all your work! I have no where near tapped all that is here.

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  38. I think I love you. lol
    I especially love that all your ingredients come from aldi. I love that store so stinking much!

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  39. I ABSOLUTELY LOVE this recipe (among others on your site)!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! You have saved my family SO MUCH MONEY these past three months!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  40. Fantastic post! I've been making this for a couple of months now and posted a link and my experience here: http://thegeekyloft.blogspot.com/

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  41. Will adding buttermilk powder upset the levening/flour ratio? Bisquik is "Buttermilk Baking Mix" correct?

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  42. Oops! I love your site! Your fake Betty Crocker cookie mixes are LIFE CHANGING! I love being in charge of what goes in them while enjoying the convenience! My 10 yr old whipped up a batch of sugar cookies last night adding dried tart cherries & white chocolate chips! :0)

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  43. Will adding buttermilk powder upset the levening/flour ratio? Bisquik is "Buttermilk Baking Mix" correct?

    ReplyDelete

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